Azzam HAIDAR

Research Scientist,
INNOVATIVE COMPUTING LABORATORY
@
The University of Tennessee
Department of Electrical Engineering
and Computer Science

I can be reached at

Mail: 1122 Volunteer Blvd
203 Claxton Complex
37996-3450 TN, USA
Phone: (+1) 865- 974-9308
Fax : (+1) 865- 974-8296
E-mail: haidar@eecs.utk.edu




Domain Decomposition
DD DD
Since 2005, I have been conducting my research at the INPT University (National Polytechnic Institut of Toulouse). During this time, I was working at the CERFACS Lab, in the Parallel Algorithms Team. Since 2010, I am pursuing my research Scientist position at the Innovative Computing Laboratory (ICL) at the University of Tennessee.

One of my research interests focus on the development and implementation of Parallel Linear Algebra routines for Scalable Multi-core Architectures. The goal is to create software frameworks that enable programmers to simplify the process of developing applications that can achieve both high performance and portability across a range of new architectures. The development of such programming models that enforce asynchronous, out of order scheduling of operations is the concept used as the basis for the definition of a scalable yet highly efficient software framework for Computational Linear Algebra applications.

another research interests is the development and implementation of numerical algorithms and software for large scale parallel sparse problems. One of my objectives is to develop hybrid approaches that combine direct and iterative algorithms to solve systems of linear algebraic equations with large sparse coefficient matrices. Such systems arise in numerical applications involving the solution of partial differential equations.

A typical grand challenge application and industrial numerical simulation requires the use of powerful parallel computing platform along with parallel algorithm to run on these platforms. In this context, i am interested in how to develop robust and scalable parallel preconditioners to accelerate convergence of the parallel iterative solver. I study preconditionning techniques for solving general sparse linear systems on massively distributed parallel computing platforms. These techniques are referred to as domain decomposition methods utilizing the Schur complement system.